I can’t wait to see this short film. I’m trying really hard to find a place where I can see it complete.

The bigger picture by Daisy Jacobs is a short film that combines, big painting characters, stop motion and paper mache.

Daisy Jacobs explains in the video that I posted here how it was made.

She painted this big characters and their arms are 3D coming out of the wall and giving the idea of real scene.

As well all the elements are made in paper mache, which in my opinion is a great touch, they look real but they are not.

This stop motion animation took her 7 months to finish but it was worthy as it won many many awards, including 2 Baftas and a nomination for the Oscars 2015.

I’m sure we will hear more about this talented film maker soon.

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Argentinian artist Leandro Erlich is back again with his visual paradox installation.

The Museum of Contemporary Art of Seoul, Korea (MMCA) has a harbour where colourful rowboats appear to be floating.

But at a closer glance, Port of Reflections, Argentinian artist Leandro Erlich turns out to be an optical illusion. The work reveals its secrets from above: the boats are actually suspended in midair, and the moving liquid that they appear to be floating in is the space below, a room with walls covered in black carpet.

Erlich wanted to create “a bizarre experience where the real and the unreal, or the real and the illusory, are exquisitely blended in surreal yet ambient surroundings,” as explained in the museum’s presentation text.
Port of Reflections has a similar taste of some of his past exhibitions including mirrored buildings that viewers can virtually climb, fake swimming pools that show people walking below the water’s surface, and a lone facade in the sky.

It will be on display at the Seoul Box at the Museum of Contemporary Art of Seoul, Korea, through September 15, 2015.

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Via The Creator Project

Photos: Leandro Erlich, Port of Reflections (2014), MMCA, Seoul, Korea. © Courtesy MMCA

Numen/For Use is a collective working in the fields of conceptual art, scenography, industrial and spatial design.

The group’s early enterprises are characterized by experiments with impersonal design and radical formal reduction, deeply rooted in the tradition of high modernism and mainly applied to various synergetic total-design projects in Croatia. From 2004. onwards, after setting up a large scale site-specific project for the production of “Inferno” in the National Centre for Drama in Madrid, Numen/ For Use become intensely involved with scenography. Further realisations in theatres across Europe ensue. Since 2008. the collective turns its focus towards configuring objects and concepts without a predefined function, an activity resulting in the more hybrid and experimental works such as the N-Light series and Tape Installation.

This project one of the N-light series and it is amazing! Three out of six surfaces of the cube are made of flexible membrane (foil mirror) with air tank and a compressor connected to it and the other three mirrors are semi transparent spy-glass. By inflating or deflating the air tank, the membrane turns convex or concave, deforming the reflections. Watch the video!

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Vienna Design Week 2009

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Ronai David, Damien Mortini and Aurelien Gantier put together Christmas Experiments, a digital advent calendar that reveals a new web-based treat every day throughout December. Each one is the product of a different developer.

My favourite is Finding Home by Michael Anthony, which features a little ball of light that travels into amazing landscapes that change colours and time, going through mountains and space and then into a galaxy, it is pretty awesome!

Check them all here:
Christmas Experiments

via It’s Nice That.

I want to tell you about an amazing illustrator who is doing an awesome project called Pequeños Grandes Mundos (Little Big Worlds). His name is Ivanke, and he is Argentinian. I came across his work via Facebook because he is a friend of a friend. He is travelling all over Latin American, staying in tiny little villages, helping kids to draw, and running workshops for free. His paying for all these projects himself and has already been to Argentina, Bolivia, Perú, Ecuador, Colombia, Guatemala, Mexico y Cuba.

There is one simple goal: to create art with children from cities all around the world, reaching boys and girls from different communities in every continent.

550 days, 50 countries drawing with kids. He spent 230 in Latin America and the next stop is Asia. You can see a film about this project here with subtitles.

How can you help? Well, you can buy his illustrations that help to subsidise the last bit of his trip in Asia here or in his online shop where you can buy beautiful framed illustrations. Christmas is coming and you will be a supporting a wonderful project!

Words by Jake Bailey

In a single room, the Digital Revolution exhibition charts the rapid progression of mass consumer technology over the last 40 years.

For those seeking a dose of digital nostalgia, there was the chance to play classic arcade games like Pong (1972) and Pac Man (1980) or boot up early home computers such as the ZX Spectrum (1982).

I wasn’t the only one taking the opportunity to relive a misspent youth, recalling the shortcuts in Super Mario Bros (1985) and reminiscing about Ceefax – how we would wait for ages for it to scroll to the flight, cinema listing or concert we wanted to book, then having to frantically scribble down the details before it moved on.

It was interesting to see the varying reactions of visitors to these devices – some with fond recollection, others – who have never known a world without the internet – with amazement at the primitive technology.

The more up-to-date installations demonstrated how technology has been used in the creation of anything from recent blockbusters like Gravity to innovative music videos.

Where next?
All very interesting, but how can these ideas influence the future as a business?

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A large screen (above) demonstrated how visual effects in the ground-breaking sci-fi film Inception (2010) were created. The fold-over sequence of Paris, much like a moving video version of Google Streetview, caught the imagination because it was gesture controlled. Users moved their hands over an invisible beam to control the visuals – something which could definitely be part of the broadcasting future. Imagine never having to search for the remote control, but simply controlling your TV by waving at it.

Energy Flow, produced by London collective FIELD, uses an algorithm – apparently based on Greek dramatic storytelling format – to piece together 10 pieces of video art in many permutations, rendering themselves to create different narratives each time.

Although it produced a slightly abstract video, it’s worth considering how this might be used in the creation of non-linear TV programmes. Much like Punchdrunks’ alternative theatre piece The Drowned Man, viewers may soon be able to dip in and out of different storylines, moving on as they please and gradually building a picture of the story presented. So, rather than moving through a storyline linearly from beginning to end, the plot is is depicted in layers, with each expanding upon the last, gradually filling in gaps and adding depth to viewers’ understanding.

Fragility of digital
Play the World by Zach Lieberman drew audio from radio stations across the world, allowing the user to play clips via a piano keyboard. The end result was a cacophonous mix of jingles, adverts, music and bulletins, providing glimpses of a rich cultural tapestry.

A definite highlight for me was people-watching, seeing how visitors, particularly younger ones, interacted with the exhibits in different ways. There was delight and spontaneity, mixed with some trepidation and varying levels of attention span. Interfaces based on gesture or action, instead of touch, seemed to particularly appeal to younger visitors.

It was also interesting to note the importance of audio as well as video in many of the experiences. In many exhibits, visitors were using several senses at once to control the performance, leading to a far more active participation than just passively looking at paintings or watching TV.

The exhibition also served as a reminder of the fragility and inherent instability of much that is digital. A number of displays had crashed, were only partly working or had been withdrawn for repair.

Many of us live and breathe technology, but sometimes it’s good to sit back and take stock – to see where we’ve come from, in order to decide where we should go next.

Digital Revolution at London’s Barbican continues until 14 September.

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